The decision on what to do with the immense blank wall along our staircase has been irresolute . . . for nearly 2 years. Should I weave a massive wall hanging? If only I had the time. How about a gallery wall? I think we’ve reached our home gallery wall limit at 2. How amazing would a living wall be? With my infamous black thumb, it wouldn’t last a month. Get my conundrum? Thankfully, inspiration is all around me and it was just a matter of time before it slapped me in the face. And by it, I mean a stunning, handmade tassel wall hanging adorning Decorist‘s San Francisco headquarters that I recently spotted and immediately demanded how it was made. To my surprise, it was as simple as making a ton of tassels out of yarn and hanging them from a dowel using twine. Honestly?! Done and done.

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You’ll need:

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Don’t overthink it when you’re buying your yarn. Go for different thicknesses and textures. It will add dimension and textural interest to your hanging. And if you want to just use one color, try different shades of the same color. Start by measuring your space and determining how long you want your tassels to hang from the dowel. I wanted mine around 6 feet long at the longest length so I first cut multiple strands of twine measuring 7 feet long – so that I had some extra twine for wrapping and knotting around the tassels and the dowel. To make your tassels, wrap your skein of yarn around a piece of cardboard or any flat hard surface. I wanted my tassels really long so I used the lid of a plastic shoebox that measures around 20 inches. Wrap the yarn about 20-30 times around.

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Cut across the top of the wrapped yarn and keep the yarn folded in half. Take the long piece of twine and bring 3 inches under the fold.

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Tie into a double knot. Take the roll of twine and start wrapping around the top of the tassel, an inch or 2 inches from the top.

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Tie into a double knot and start wrapping, creating a neck of sorts.

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Tie into a double knot and trim. Trim the twine at the top of tassel as well, leaving the long piece in tact.

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Continue making tassels until you think you have enough. You’ll start to pick up shortcuts when cutting your yarn. I, for example, started wrapping the entire skein around the hard surface, cutting it and the dividing it into sections.

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Get a wooden dowel from your local hardware store – they will usually cut it to length for you. Stain it with a wood stain if you want it a certain color. I drilled it directly into the wall but you can screw in a couple of hooks and hang it from those. Get up on a ladder (you might need some assistance here) and start tying your tassels to the dowel.

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I didn’t double knot at the top until I finished hanging all my tassels. This way, I could untie them and adjust their placement. Once you’re happy with the way it looks, go back and double knot each piece of twine. Trim the tails.

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The best part is you can easily change out the colors over time. Perfect for someone as indecisive as me!

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(images by HonestlyWTF & Ashley Batz; thank you to Decorist for the tutorial!)