DIY Shibori

Today marks HonestlyWTF’s four year anniversary. Four years! To celebrate, we’re revisiting the very first tutorial we ever featured on the site: shibori tie dye. Lauren and I first discovered shibori after discovering an old photo on the web. The idea of recreating an ancient Japanese dyeing technique inspired us to spend an entire weekend experimenting with our favorite deep blue, indigo. After dyeing just about every white article of clothing in sight, our blue stained fingers excitedly uploaded the tutorial – we couldn’t wait to share it with our 30 readers. And so began the ongoing series of tutorials and DIYs. We hope you enjoy the throwback, one of our favorites to date!

shibori30

You’ll need:

  • an indigo dye kit
  • natural fiber clothing or fabric
  • 2 5 gallon buckets
  • rubber gloves
  • small wood squares
  • rubber bands
  • twine
  • a PVC pipe
  • a long wooden stick
  • a drop cloth
  • rubber gloves
  • scissors

shibori2

When choosing fabric or clothing, it’s important that made of natural fibers. Cotton, wool, silk or linen work best. I also like to pre-wash my fabric before dyeing. Here I’m using rectangular dinner napkins but obviously, any shape or article of clothing will do! Here are just a few basic binding techniques to try:

Itajime shibori is known as the shape-resist technique. To start, fold the fabric like an accordion.

shibori3

Fold it again in the other direction – again, like an accordion. Place it between two pieces of wood, or any flat shaped object, and bind it together with string or rubber bands. The shapes and rubber bands will prevent the dye from penetrating the fabric they cover. The larger the shape and the more rubber bands you use, the more white you will see. The smaller the shape and fewer rubber bands you use, the more indigo you will see.

shibori4

Arashi is the Japanese term for “storm” and it’s also known as the pole-wrapping technique. It starts by wrapping fabric around a plastic PVC pipe at a diagonal. Once the fabric is wrapped, tie a piece of twine into a double knot at the base of the pipe.

shibori5

Wrap the twine around the fabric. After 6-7 wraps around the pipe, scrunch the fabric down. Give the twine a strong tug to tighten. Tightening before scrunching will make it more difficult to control and move the fabric.

shibori6

Continue wrapping, scrunching and tightening until all the fabric is compacted. Tie a knot above the fabric. The pattern will be on a diagonal with thin lines of white, where the twine is binding the fabric.

shibori7

Kumo shibori is known as the pleat and bind technique. It involves binding the fabric in very close sections, which results in several spider like designs. This is just one of many ways to experiment with this technique. Start by folding the fabric into an accordion. Pinch and bind into equal sections.

shibori8

Do the same with the opposite side, in staggered sections. Continue binding with rubber bands, working your way towards the center.

shibori9

Keep binding until you can’t go any further. Add additional rubber bands to make the fabric into a tight bundle.

shibori10

Be resourceful when binding – use clamps, paper clips, binder clips, odd shaped wooden pieces, canning jar lids, etc. There is no right or wrong way to shibori!

shibori13

To set up the indigo dye vat, follow the accompanying dye kit instructions. For this particular kit, start by filling a 5 gallon bucket with 4 gallons of warm water. Pour the indigo dye powder into the bucket and stir in a circular motion.

shibori14

Then pour in the soda ash and reduction agent. Stir again in a circular motion and then in reverse. It is important not to oxidize the dye bath so keeping it covered and stirring it gently is recommended. Once the dyed is well mixed, cover for at least an hour. When you check on the dye, you’ll notice a foamy oil-slick looking top layer and a neon yellow-greenish colored liquid below. This is when you know the dye is ready.

shibori16

Rinse the fabric in another bucket of clean water. Squeeze out all the water before submerging it into the indigo dye bath. Gently manipulate and massage the dye into the fabric. Again, try not to agitate the dye by working gently under the surface of the dye.

shibori17

After about 5 minutes, take the fabric out of the dye. It will have a green hue but after several minutes, as it is exposed to oxygen, it will turn dark blue. Carefully peek inside one of your pieces and you’ll see the areas in which the dye wasn’t able to penetrate. Lookin’ good!

shibori18

After all the pieces have been dyed and allowed to oxidize, go ahead and repeat the dying process. The more it goes into the dye bath, the darker the indigo hue the fabric will be. And remember, the fabric will always look darker when wet and will fade a bit when washed for the first time.

shibori19

After dyeing, allow the pieces to dry and set. I like to leave them overnight before unwrapping the pieces. Put on a fresh pair of gloves, grab a pair of scissors and keep that bucket of clean water nearby. Give the bound pieces a good rinse in water and then carefully snip away the rubber bands and twine. First up is the shape resist technique. See how the fabric is gridded with striped lines from the rubber bands? My wooden squares weren’t able to exclude the dye completely and I love it! That is the beauty of shibori – there are no mistakes.

shibori21

Now for the pole tying technique . . .

shibori23

And the pleated and bound resist technique . . .

shibori20

I used binder clips here to bind a square accordion fold.

shibori24

Here, I simply knotted all four corners of the fabric individually.

shibori25

And then there is the good ol’ binding method we all did in grade school.

shibori26

Once all the pieces have been unwrapped, wash them in the washing machine with cold water without detergent. Line dry, or dry on the lowest heat setting in a dryer, and iron to set the color.

shibori0

The dye vat should allow you to dye at least 5 pounds of fabric. If you keep it covered after each use, it should last up to 5 days. Have fun!

shibori28

 (images by HonestlyWTF)

Leave a Comment

328 Comments

  1. Congratulations for this 4 years!! this DIY is really cool!!!

    http://www.stelstyle.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  2. Congratulations on 4 years! Love this DIY.

    http://juliettelaura.blogspot.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  3. Denisa wrote:

    Very nice inspiration.
    xx
    http://www.fashiondenis.com/

    5.20.14
    Reply
  4. Margot wrote:

    Love the idea of napkins! Makes me nostalgic for that time 4(!!!!) years ago. XO

    5.20.14
    Reply
  5. Amina wrote:

    Love this DYI! Might give it a try over the weekend.

    5.20.14
    Reply
  6. Meredith wrote:

    Happy 4 years! Love this technique! Xoxo
    Lelaandlace.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  7. Congratulations on your 4 year anniversary and wish all the best for the next years to come! Also,this tutorial is so great! The tips on how to keep the textiles and set the patterns!

    http://taliawaynebeauty.blogspot.com/

    5.20.14
    Reply
  8. YES.

    5.20.14
    Reply
  9. How cool!

    This is a definite must-try~

    xo
    Deanne Castro
    http://myfashavenue.com/

    5.20.14
    Reply
  10. I have been wanting to try shibori (and even bought the indigo dye supplies a few months ago) but have been hesitant for some reason. Your tutorial was one of the most robust tutorials I have seen – thank you for sharing! This is just the impetus I need to give it a try this weekend (yay for long holiday weekends!).

    5.20.14
    Reply
  11. Dominique wrote:

    this is so cool!

    xxx
    http://www.dominiquecandido.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  12. Caitlin wrote:

    I just saw a ton of indigo tie dye in Bazaar Magazine. I’ll have to try some of these! They’re beautiful!

    Caitlin
    lifealamodeblog.wordpress.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  13. Rory wrote:

    Congrats on four great years! Can’t wait for many many more 🙂
    Rory
    http://www.WearAboutsBlog.com

    5.20.14
    Reply
  14. Emi wrote:

    Love your blog,I do love how you explain all DiY.
    I can not stop reading it, go on please!!!

    Thanks!!
    xo

    buy online diesel watches

    5.20.14
    Reply
  15. Renee wrote:

    Indigo Tie Die. So Hot right Now!
    There is always something nostalgic about the tie die and Summer.

    5.20.14
    Reply
  16. Jeanne wrote:

    Lovely inspo and DIY!
    XO
    Jeanne
    http://fashionmusingsdiary.blogspot.fr

    5.20.14
    Reply
  17. Bre & Ree wrote:

    Congratulations on your anniversary! How exciting! And thank you so much for sharing the DIY tie dye, it’s absolutely gorgeous and my daughter would adore a project like this. Have a great week!
    ~Bre

    5.20.14
    Reply
  18. It’s really a nice and useful piece of info. I am happy that you shared this helpful
    info with us. Please keep us informed like this.
    Thanks for sharing.

    5.20.14
    Reply
  19. Lisa Kaufman wrote:

    Happy DIY Anniversary! Thanks for sharing all of your rockin projects!

    5.20.14
    Reply
  20. Marsha wrote:

    I have to try this! It is so cool! Thanks for four years of DIY!

    5.20.14
    Reply
  21. Lauren wrote:

    Can beat a bit of tie dye for summer
    Lauren
    livinginaboxx

    5.20.14
    Reply
  22. Love this diy <3

    5.20.14
    Reply
  23. jennine wrote:

    Happy blogiversary! Can’t believe it’s been 4 years!

    What a wonderful DIY, so pretty!

    5.20.14
    Reply
  24. Abhilasha wrote:

    OMG this is so pretty….makes me wanna jump off my chair …right into a bucket of dye!! so beautiful

    5.21.14
    Reply
  25. María wrote:

    WOW, amazing technique!
    Thanks for sharing it.
    Lots of love, xx

    http://marysreturn.blogspot.com.ar/
    http://marysreturn.blogspot.com.ar/

    5.21.14
    Reply
  26. Pat Schwab wrote:

    Congrats on your 4 successful years. Love your blog. Pat S

    5.21.14
    Reply
  27. Lisa wrote:

    Congrats! I wonder if you have advice about how to do shibori on a garment?

    5.21.14
    Reply
  28. marie wrote:

    I can’t believe it’s already been 4 years… 🙂 congrats!

    5.21.14
    Reply
  29. What a great throw back. Congratulations at reaching 4 years.

    http://beautifulpromiserings.com/

    5.21.14
    Reply
  30. Avery wrote:

    Thank you for providing a great idea along with the directions. At Afrobeatnik, we have an artisan program where you can create more by working less. I see many connections between this post and Afrobeatnik!

    afrobeatnikshop.com

    5.21.14
    Reply
  31. Bee wrote:

    Happy 4th Anniversary!!! I hope you had an epic dinner party and used these beautiful creations as napkins or placemats, or heck – beautiful flags in the night breeze!! Love your site! Definitely pinning this one for future use! Thanks!

    5.23.14
    Reply
  32. Diana wrote:

    Wow. Absolutely must DIY! Congratulations on the four years by the way!

    http://dzyana.com

    5.25.14
    Reply
  33. koshin tran wrote:

    Thank you for the thorough tutorial.

    5.26.14
    Reply
  34. sumona wrote:

    Honestly , brilliant and simple ideas..

    5.29.14
    Reply
  35. Maitland wrote:

    Great tutorial and great results too – glad you reposted it after 4 years.

    6.6.14
    Reply
  36. Kara Bloom wrote:

    Wow, your binding techniques are so creative and they all turned out so rad! I just started experimenting with indigo; it’s pretty addicting! I also started an Etsy shop with some indigo products; you can take a peep at my shop here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/karalylah

    6.9.14
    Reply
  37. Each piece is absolutely beautiful! A great DIY Tutorial and what a great result!

    6.13.14
    Reply
  38. Tie dye definetly made a comeback.

    6.28.14
    Reply
  39. WOW! This is amazing! I gotta try this! So much perfect this summer.

    Congratulations for the wonderful 4 years! Keep it going.

    7.17.14
    Reply
  40. Carla wrote:

    How gorgeous! Do you think this technique can work on a large wool blanket? Or is it best for small pieces of fabric?

    7.24.14
    Reply
    • Erica wrote:

      @Carla, Yes – it would definitely work on larger pieces of fabric like a blanket. I would just make sure you leave it in the vat long enough and be sure to return it to the dye vat a few times so that color really saturates. Good luck!

      7.24.14
  41. April wrote:

    <3 brilliant, your are

    7.24.14
    Reply
  42. Lis wrote:

    This is so amazing! Going to try!

    8.28.14
    Reply
  43. Angela wrote:

    This was a great tutorial. I took a workshop from John Marshall several years ago and bought the Indigo Dye kit. Bur your Shibori tutorial was excellent and helped me create some beautiful patterns (like yours). I do have one question, though. I loved the white/blue contrast but once I washed them (actually more like rinsed) my white turned into a pretty light blue. Did I leave something out?

    8.30.14
    Reply
  44. Sandy wrote:

    Great and Excellent and I am trying now but It’s harder to find same as yours.

    9.25.14
    Reply
  45. Tpcgallery wrote:

    Excellent, I have made it… Huhhhaaaa

    9.26.14
    Reply
  46. Barbara Hoepp wrote:

    Thanks so much. Can’t wait to start dyeing.

    9.30.14
    Reply
  47. zen wrote:

    Wow, 4 years! 🙂 I hope hapinesswherever.wordpress.com is ard 4 yrs later- and if I’m half as successful as HonestlyWTF would be elated 🙂 Didn’t know this technique was called Shiori 🙂 Love learning new things! 🙂

    10.10.14
    Reply
  48. MARTHA wrote:

    TE FELICITO , HE VISTO VARIAS PAGINAS DE INTERNET EXPLICANDO ESTA TECNICA, PERO TU LA ENSEÑAS DE UNA MANERA PRACTICA, SENCILLA Y MUY COMPRENSIBLE …GRACIAS POR COMPARTIRLA…..POSEES ESE DON DE ENSEÑAR……….QUE DIOS TE BENDIGA SIEMPRE Y QUE LAS PERSONAS QUE TE ADMIRAMOS PODAMOS SEGUIR COMPARTIENDO CONTIGO…..HASTA PRONTO…….MARTHA

    10.26.14
    Reply
  49. MARTHA wrote:

    TE FELICITO, HE VISTO VARIAS PAGINAS DE INTERNET EXPLICANDO ESTA TECNICA, PERO TU LA ENSEÑAS DE UNA MANERA PRACTICA, SENCILLA Y MUY COMPRENSIBLE……GRACIAS POR COMPARTIRLA…….POSEES ESE DON DE ENSEÑAR……..QUE DIOS TE BENDIGA SIEMPRE Y QUE LAS PERSONAS QUE SEGUIMOS TU PAGINA, PODAMOS SEGUIR APRENDIENDO CONTIGO……HASTA PRONTO MARTHA

    10.26.14
    Reply
  50. Nicole wrote:

    Where did you purchase napkins for dyeing?
    Beautiful post!
    Thank you.

    11.10.14
    Reply
  51. Love the napkins you dyed. Learned a great deal of techniques to try on my own. http://www.sanassilkywayshop.com

    12.5.14
    Reply
  52. love it have it in my SHOP but from INDIA

    12.14.14
    Reply
  53. leanne wrote:

    I love tie dye, I enjoyed it so much at school, this makes me miss it a lot! I love the colours and the patterns, so pretty x

    http://leannewinters.blogspot.co.uk

    1.9.15
    Reply
  54. Rebecca Ternasky wrote:

    This is one of the BEST tutorials I have seen– Thanks so much for doing this!

    2.5.15
    Reply
  55. One of the best tutorials ever !! amazing. thanks

    2.23.15
    Reply
  56. asifsaeed wrote:

    very nice ideas

    4.16.15
    Reply
  57. BVM wrote:

    Can’t wait to try this! How do you dispose of the dye solution post-project? Thanks!

    4.30.15
    Reply
  58. sasa wrote:

    is this vat dye or reactive dye you used?

    5.10.15
    Reply
  59. Emmi wrote:

    What is the powder that you are uaing?

    5.12.15
    Reply
  60. Gift wrote:

    You are a prolific teacher, nice teaching

    5.15.15
    Reply
  61. Julia wrote:

    Do you think it is possible to do the same techniques but use bleach instead of the dye?

    5.16.15
    Reply
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    5.22.15
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  63. Libby wrote:

    Indigo dying

    5.26.15
    Reply
  64. Boy, you created some beautiful patterns. I’m definitely gonna try your techniques soon. About 2 weeks ago my daughter and I did some tie dye shirts for her friends at school and I wish that I had found your blog before we did our projects. Thanks so much for sharing. Am definitely sharing this on my Pinterest. Take care, Terri of Two Pink Peas. http://www.TwoPinkPeas.com

    5.27.15
    Reply
  65. karla wrote:

    i am in love with this process of shiboir! thank you so much for the easy to follow and “you can do it” how to!
    i put my own experience on my blog and linked it back to you for the beautiful photos and tips! glad i found you!!

    5.27.15
    Reply
  66. Diana wrote:

    Looks like such a great idea!
    http://www.dianavilic.com/

    6.10.15
    Reply
  67. That tie dye has come out so well, and it looks like such a fun process too!

    6.25.15
    Reply
  68. Tamara Shurling wrote:

    Beautiful! There is one, bottom line all the way to the left, almost looks like feathers, how did you do that one?

    7.17.15
    Reply
  69. nancymrazchase wrote:

    You mention soda ash and reduction agent. does this come in the pkg of Indigo Blue ? Or is that separate?

    7.21.15
    Reply
    • Erica wrote:

      @Nancy, yes – both are included in the Indigo Kit!

      7.21.15
  70. Priyanka wrote:

    Thanks Erica for the beautiful experiment and so nice of you for sharing it with us. Result is amazing and will definitely try it.

    8.10.15
    Reply
  71. Andrea wrote:

    What is the technique you used to get the pattern second from the left in the upper row? I love that one but I can’t figure out which technique it is?

    8.13.15
    Reply
  72. When some one searches for his essential thing, therefore he/she wishes to be available that in detail, thus
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    8.20.15
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  73. Neeta chugh wrote:

    Wow this is innovative dye can’t wait to start dyeing

    8.22.15
    Reply
  74. Simone wrote:

    Hi I just came across your site – I wanted to ask with the Shibori dyeing tutorial what process was used for the shirt shown in the picture looks great
    thanks
    Simone

    8.24.15
    Reply
  75. Anna wrote:

    I love the one that is second from the left on the top row…how did you accomplish this look? Didn’t see it in your descriptions.

    9.9.15
    Reply
  76. Silvia wrote:

    Hi Marta!! First of all I love your work!!
    I’m trying to do Shibori foulards, and I have been testing different textile inks.
    Is the Indigo Dye kit a good ink? when you wash the fabrics in wash machine the white areas, still continue white?
    Thanks for your post, and I will be grateful If you answer me.
    Thanks in advance!!

    Silvia

    9.15.15
    Reply
  77. Greate pieces. Keep posting such kind of info on your page.

    Im really impressed by your site.
    Hey there, You’ve performed a fantastic job. I will definitely digg it and individually suggest to my friends.
    I’m sure they’ll be benefited from this web site.

    10.10.15
    Reply
  78. Billie McCray wrote:

    I love shibori and I purchased a piece at QuiltFest. Hand quilted the design that was prevalent in it and made a quilted wall hanging. It turned out fantastic. I use it for everything and I love just looking at it. Thanks for the tutorial in dying the fabric.

    10.21.15
    Reply
  79. Miki wrote:

    Nice idea. I will definitly try it!!! Thank you:)

    10.24.15
    Reply
  80. Maria wrote:

    Looking for a monlight color blue I have come across to this page and samples and to my enormous suprise the girl in the photo is identical to me. Can you please get in contact with me as I am totally astonished. I levae in Spain but are Colombian originin and cannot understand why I am in that photo as it is oractically impossible to believe I may have a twin somewhere..

    I will be much pleased if you could be so kind to contact me at my mail box so that I can share photos of myself with you to proof my statement..

    Many thanks,
    Maria

    1.8.16
    Reply
  81. Jordan wrote:

    i love all of these and have completed most, but my favorite of all the one you said binding method the one which we all learned in grade school i cannot seem to remember can you tell me in an email how you did that one? it is my all time favorite and i want to get it just right please and thank you

    – Jordan

    1.18.16
    Reply
  82. I Like it !

    1.28.16
    Reply
  83. Rachel wrote:

    This is an awesome tutorial! I absolutely love that you showed how the items were tied up and how they looked after – can’t wait to try!

    XO, Rachel
    http://www.seashellsandsparkles.com

    2.10.16
    Reply
  84. test wrote:

    lookie here

    2.15.16
    Reply
  85. Christian wrote:

    Thank you so much for this DIY tutorial! I have a crap load of cotton dyes but I’m mostly a wool dyer. Now I have a new project 😀 thank you!

    2.26.16
    Reply
  86. Ashley wrote:

    Hi! I love these and was wondering where do you buy the fabric to make these with?

    3.30.16
    Reply
  87. I like your all the tricks for white cloths. The most impressive thing that I like most is to make all these patterns on cloths by using any color without using any Machine.

    4.5.16
    Reply
  88. Shibotik wrote:

    nice tutorial , thans for info , Shibotik

    4.16.16
    Reply
  89. Vanessa wrote:

    Is it just uses a blue color indigo plant? whether there are other extras that make the blue color was so beautiful and so bright? is there a special way of coloring on the fabric?

    4.18.16
    Reply
  90. Yen wrote:

    Always love the indigo shibori, great job. Will feature something in my website too. http://www.denimfans.cn

    4.27.16
    Reply
  91. Cécile wrote:

    Magnifique, je vais essayer!!!!
    Merci

    4.27.16
    Reply
  92. Jen wrote:

    Hi, How did you get the napkin with the pole dying technique to look like 3 different shades of blue? Does it automatically do that because of how it is wound, or did you vary how much of the fabric you submerged in dye?

    5.5.16
    Reply
    • Erica wrote:

      @Jen it just turned out that way because of the way it was bound. The overlapped fabric will take in less dye, which creates a lighter shade of indigo.

      5.5.16
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    5.8.16
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  94. Caitlyn wrote:

    Only just came across this tutorial! Love it. Just bought the kit. Does the soda ash and reduction agent come together in the pack? The link only lists ‘reducing agent’ as being included’…do I have to buy soda ash separately..?
    Thank you!!

    5.18.16
    Reply
  95. andy wrote:

    innovating dyeing I like it

    6.2.16
    Reply
  96. I enjoy what you guys are usually up too. This kind
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    6.5.16
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  97. Maxine wrote:

    Hello, This is a great article with so much detail and great photos to go with the content.
    Can you tell me have you ever tried this technique on white leather? I have come across some pieces of leather and wondered if this would work? Love to know 🙂

    6.5.16
    Reply
  98. nice Contetn. Enjoy it.! 🙂

    6.28.16
    Reply
  99. Rizwan Siddique wrote:

    U can be used to be a good time to time

    7.2.16
    Reply
  100. Christa Bohmer wrote:

    Hi Thanks for a very helpful tutorial. I wonder if you could help me with some advice as my experiments have not been as successful as your beautiful pieces. As soon as the fabric is doubled up (for example if wrapped around a cylindrical object twice), the layers underneath come out totally undyed/white or much much lighter. I wet my pieces before dyeing. Help! What am I doing wrong?
    Also what are your tips for keeping unused indigo dye and reactivating it for later use?
    Thanks and warm regards from South Africa
    Christa

    7.11.16
    Reply
  101. Kayla wrote:

    I love this! just purchased a indigo kit and some white cotton tea towels! I can’t wait to try it!

    NativeHouse.etsy.com

    7.16.16
    Reply
  102. Really nice work! The blues patterns are always a hit. You have talent for the craft.

    10.11.16
    Reply
  103. Jan wrote:

    Thanks for this wonderful article. Three of us used it as our guide today as we did our first round of shibori dyeing! More tomorrow!

    10.22.16
    Reply
  104. Malika wrote:

    I l’île shibori. I née more exemple.
    Thank
    Malika

    11.15.16
    Reply
  105. Malika wrote:

    I like shibori. I need more exemple.
    Thank
    Malika

    11.15.16
    Reply
  106. Larry Saliga wrote:

    Hello, I am Mr. Larry Saliga a teacher from the Philippines. I am currently writing a Module for out of school youth (ADM-Alternative Delivery Mode). I would like to ask permission if I can use your Photo as an illustration on the competency on textile tradition in Tie-dye in Japan. I am hoping for your positive response.

    http://honestlywtf.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/shibori21.jpg

    Thank you very much.

    11.25.16
    Reply
  107. Nakkase wrote:

    Beatifull 🙂 I need more exemple.

    My blog and e-commerce site http://nakkase.com

    12.30.16
    Reply
  108. Ramanjit sekhon wrote:

    nyc attempt …
    its lovely

    2.4.17
    Reply
  109. Wow! Thanks for sharing!
    -Egoteest

    http://egoteest.com

    2.20.17
    Reply
  110. windi wrote:

    awsome design
    thanks for sharing

    3.11.17
    Reply
  111. I renewed nguti wrote:

    I will like to know where I can order this beautifully blue and white cloth

    3.26.17
    Reply
  112. Nina Owens wrote:

    Hi Erica & Lauren,

    I am the Social Media Specialist for Michaels Stores responsible for Pinterest and we would love permission to pin DIY projects, especially the Shibori to our Pinterest boards. We only pin with permission from the original source so our pins link correctly. We believe in giving credit to content originators.

    Thank you for your consideration,
    Nina O.

    3.28.17
    Reply
  113. Lynne wrote:

    Your results look brilliant ! Pity some of the technical instructions are so wrong…. a) ironing does NOT set indigo – the oxidisation process does this. b) Soda ash will not dissolve in warm water – you should dissolve the soda ash in very hot water and then add to the vat c) indigo dyed pieces need to be washed extremely well in hot soapy water multiple times to remove all the surface dye – cold water and no detergent won’t be sufficient. I could go on…. How do I know this ? A lifetime of dyeing experience with industry experience and technical qualifications. Thank you !

    4.22.17
    Reply
  114. Fabric Heart wrote:

    great idea! I am sure the fabric exchange has so many choices of fabric for this kind of project.

    4.28.17
    Reply
  115. Else wrote:

    Hello,
    really nice. But I wonder how the color remains after first wash??? I have bought some nice indigo fabric but unfortunately the color is not waterproof .. even before washing you have indigo on your hands.
    I have indigo color but not the kit you talk about… maybe some chimical product could help to fix the color??
    Thanks. Else.
    I’ve just read Lynne comment .. is there a way to save my bought fabric with hot water and detergent?? no chimical product?

    6.26.17
    Reply
  116. One of the best step by step tie dye instruction guides posted on the web. The pictures are superb. The wording is clear. Congratulations on such a good post. Tie Dyed Shop

    7.25.17
    Reply
  117. Thank you, Erica, for the wonderful write-up. The step by step guideline does make the process very exciting and fun filled. Thank you for your efforts and the wonderful images.
    Roopali.
    http://www.roopantaran.com

    8.13.17
    Reply
  118. LC wrote:

    Thank you so much for this amazing DIY I fell in love with shibori tie dye it is absolutely amazing and you made it so easy, for a school project I had to make a tie dye pillow I looked through heaps of tie dye designs but could never find the right one but when I came across your page I knew this was the one. Something about the traditional and contemporary style really stood out to me, I chose the itajime style and it looked fantastic! I can’t wait to decorate it and to put it on my bed, Thank so much ❤️❤️❤️

    9.1.17
    Reply
  119. linwang wrote:

    Dear Customer ,

    Wish you a nice day!

    Very glad to know you may need Indigo Dye.
    It is mainly used to dye cotton fibre .The pop “cowboy” clothes mostly are made by
    indigo.
    We are the professional manufacturer and supplier for Indigo dye with good quality and very competitive price in China.

    Indigo Dye: Dark Blue Granular
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    If you are interested in Indigo Dye, please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information.

    Look forward to hearing from you.
    With Kind Regards,
    Linwang

    Hebei Linheng Bio-Tech Co.,Ltd
    Website: http://www.hblinheng.com
    Email: linwang@hblinheng.com
    Phone: +86 13932126562
    Address: No 10 Yuxin Road ,Qiaoxi District,
    Shijiazhuang City,Hebei Province,China

    9.11.17
    Reply
  120. Nancy wrote:

    Hi,
    This is so beautiful. I tried it myself already twice and love it. However, once I wash the dyed pieces in the washing machine, the white parts take on blue color as well and turn light blue. I am a bit sad because I particularly loved the.contrast before. Do you have an idea how to prevent that? Has it never happened to you? I rinsed the fabric and even let dry the fabric before washing without detergent at cold temperature… Can you help? Would be very much appreciated. Thanks, Nancy

    9.20.17
    Reply
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    9.24.17
    Reply
  122. Zakir solanki wrote:

    Hi
    Nice

    10.10.17
    Reply
  123. Rashi wrote:

    Lovely indigo shibori, great job.

    12.8.17
    Reply
  124. Eva milne wrote:

    I’m “dyeing” to try it! What was the name of the kit you used? Would it be better or cheaper
    To buy everything separately and what would I need to buy? How much indigo (a certain kind?)
    How much soda ash? Anything else to buy? Thanks, eva

    1.30.18
    Reply
  125. I LOVE SHIBORI ITS JUST PART OF MY LIFE #SHIBORI I LOVEEEEEEEEEE IT #SUPPORTSHIBORILOVERS I HEART SHIBORI

    2.25.18
    Reply
  126. I have just discovered your post. I know I’m late but thanks You because it gives me a strong motivation to try.
    Regards

    3.28.18
    Reply
  127. Becky wrote:

    Thank you for the information. I love this and plan to do my own thing with it

    5.10.18
    Reply
  128. Elizabeth Klein wrote:

    Beautifully explained! I’m experimenting with fabric spray paint and shibori, but this looks even richer.

    6.8.18
    Reply
  129. Ana Rosa wrote:

    Me encanta esta técnica

    6.13.18
    Reply
  130. Congratulations on your 4 year anniversary and wish all the best for the next years to come! Also,this tutorial is so great! The tips on how to keep the textiles and set the patterns

    http://www.textilebuzz.com

    7.4.18
    Reply
  131. Archana wrote:

    Brilliant Read!!! loving ur ideas.thanks for publishing such an informative post.

    7.10.18
    Reply
  132. TERRY RADEMACHER wrote:

    Can you use the Rit Dye method using salt and dish detergent as a substitute to this method?
    Thank you
    Terry

    7.13.18
    Reply
    • Erica wrote:

      I find that other dyes don’t achieve that rich, blue hue as well as real indigo powder does. But that’s just my opinion! It’s worth a try!

      7.13.18
  133. Irena Donath Valles wrote:

    Just took a ‘shibori’ class at our Library … loved it !
    Where can I buy the shibori dye??

    7.25.18
    Reply
  134. Harry j Plourde wrote:

    Wow this is magic just got into this I’m a artist who works with vintage bed sheet this would be perfect for me thank you

    7.29.18
    Reply
  135. Lisa wrote:

    This is soooo helpful!! Thank you!

    8.5.18
    Reply